Does Your Child with ADHD Need Help with Homework?

Are you looking for ways to help your child or teen handle the daily struggle with homework? The struggle (theirs and yours) is real. It may look like a lack of motivation, or defiance, forgetfulness or even a learning disability but in reality, it is probably their Executive Function skills.

The Homework Help for ADHD covers seven Executive Function skills that have the biggest impact on homework and includes information on what to look for and plenty of strategies to help compensate.

Laine Dougherty - Notebook - Homework Help for ADHD - blue #1

Due to the current circumstances and requirements for social distancing, our classes and individual services will be conducted via Zoom or Google Hangouts.

Tip 3: Structure is not a bad thing

Here is the third tip on organizing your kids for summer. If you just started reading I suggest you follow the links to the first part of this three part blog and start from there and read back. Although the summer is often the time we think of breaking out of our daily routine, it is a good idea to maintain some sense of schedule even during the summer. Following a routine can teach responsibility, accountability and time management skills. Teach responsibility by having kids follow a routine to get ready for the day and to end it, such as get dressed before breakfast or a ten minute pickup of all their things before going to bed. Create a job chart and let them pick which jobs they want. Explain that the family is a team and everyone helps so everyone can have time to play together.

Scheduling some reading time each day will help get through the summer reading list with ease and Mom and Dad may get to read the newspaper too. Keep up those academic skills by playing games together, practicing math facts, naming the 50 states or putting together a family newspaper for the relatives. Have a family game night or movie night towards the end of the week as a “reward” for staying on track. Making learning fun encourages your child to learn more. Maintaining a structure develops habits, makes children aware of what is coming up and reduces outbursts. Also if they know what is coming up, you may not hear  “I’m bored” quite so many times this summer. So plan in some structure and some fun this summer and let me know how it goes.

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