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Homework Coach or Enforcer?

Homework Coach or Enforcer?

Is homework a battle in your home? If you find that it has become a nightly battle or that your child or teen has lost interest in school; then it may be time to try a different approach. I will admit I sympathize with teens trying to become independent when often the adults around them are inadvertently taking away their sense of control. If you find that you are constantly asking them if their homework is done or suggesting ways for them to get it done then here are five tips to take you from homework enforcer to homework coach. Remember the role of a good coach is to encourage problem solving skills, develop independence and provide support when needed. The first and most important step is to realize whether or not you are enabling your child/teen to feel helpless. If you are constantly reminding them to do their homework, get ready for school, pack their backpack, or go to bed why would they need to remember? The same thing applies if you are solving their problems for them or designing their notebook your way. All of these things take the pressure off of your teen and puts it on you. You’ll need to work together to figure out how much your teen can do independently and what he or she might need a little support for. I know it is often easier to keep track of it yourself, but teaching your teen to problem solve, keep track of assignments and get their work done independently are all skills they need to develop for a successful life. Ask questions...
Backpack Do’s and Don’ts

Backpack Do’s and Don’ts

The first term is coming to an end in the next week. How is your child/teen doing so far this year? Did they start off strong and then start to slip? Do you find yourself reminding them to do their homework and still find they have “surprise” last minute projects or tests? It can be frustrating, I know. What I have noticed in my work with students is that sometimes parents are “too close” and your voice becomes like Charlie Brown’s mother’s (wahhh wahhh wahhh). Sometimes having your child/teen be accountable to someone else is helpful. I have designed a program that sends daily emails to your child to keep them on track and to help them develop the skills they need in school. Here is a sample from Day 9 of the End Homework Hassle ELearning Course. Check it out at: www.endhomeworkhassle.com Day 9: Let’s take a look at your backpack today. First, go get it and take it to the bathroom and weigh it. If it won’t balance on the scale you can weigh yourself without holding it and then with it….and then do the math. 1. Weight of backpack = __B__ 2. Your weight x .10 = ___A___ 3.  Is B ≥ A? If the backpack weighs more than 10% of your weight, then try to take out what you don’t need. Some students bring home all their books because they don’t want to check their agendas for the homework they have and bring it all home, just in case. For example if you weigh 100 pounds, your backpack should weigh 10 pounds or less or...
Top 5 Things To Do This Week to Organize for School

Top 5 Things To Do This Week to Organize for School

1. Clean out your child’s closet with them and make room for the clothes they will be wearing to school this year. Pass along things that they won’t wear or that do not fit. No need to take up valuable “real estate space” with things they won’t wear. Do the same with the dresser. Hooks are great for hanging sweatshirts, jackets, pj’s and tomorrow’s clothes. 2. Together with your child, buy any school supplies they may need. Make sure the binder opens easily with one hand and will last till December (at least). Work with them to put them together in an organized way. 3. Be a reading role model. Set aside some evening time when the whole family reads either together or separately. Kids can work on their summer reading and you can catch up on those magazines. 4. Talk with your kids about what they want for lunches and/or snacks and work together to come up with a week’s worth of healthy ideas. Next week you can shop for them. 5. Start working towards the bedtime you want your child to have during the school year. Kids require 8.5-9.5 hours of sleep so calculate when their bedtime should be in order to wake up easily by the necessary time for school. If you’re dreading the start of school and are hoping that this year will be different, then check out www.endhomeworkhassle.com. I’ll send daily reminders to your child or teen with tips and strategies so they can have an organized...